IF

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
 
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
 
If you can dream – and not make dreams your master;
If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
 
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,
And stoop and build ‘em up with wornout tools:
 
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
 
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
 
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
 
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run -
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And – which is more – you’ll be a Man my son!
 
Rudyard Kipling

According to the English magazine Masonic Illustrated, Kipling became a Freemason in about 1885, some six months prior to the usual minimum age of 21.[43] He was initiated into Hope and Perseverance Lodge No. 782 in Lahore. He later wrote to The Times of London, “I was Secretary for some years of the Lodge . . . , which included Brethren of at least four creeds. I was entered [as an Apprentice] by a member from Brahmo Somaj, a Hindu, passed [to the degree of Fellow Craft] by a Mohammedan, and raised [to the degree of Master Mason] by an Englishman. Our Tyler was an Indian Jew.” Kipling so loved his masonic experience that he memorialised its ideals in his famous poem, “The Mother Lodge”. Wikipedia

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  1. #1 by Joanne on April 20, 2012 - 4:54 pm

    Thank you for sharing this Jewel Kim.

    • #2 by Kim Graae Munch on April 20, 2012 - 8:10 pm

      Glad you like it joanne.
      I think If has been misunderstood by many, but it is really an esoteric text.

  2. #3 by Margarete on April 20, 2012 - 11:55 pm

    Just got the message that there is a new post – thank you!

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